Posts Tagged ‘sociedad’

Gated Communities

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

IMG_20150129_212911
Guatemalan middle class has found sanctuary living within gated communities.
(more…)

Sexual Violence in Guatemala

Saturday, July 16th, 2011

A woman goes out to a club wearing a miniskirt. She gets pretty drunk and stumbles home in the wrong direction. She ends up lost in a bad neighborhood. She gets raped. Is she to blame in some way? Was this her fault? Was she asking for it? (via You Are Not So Smart)

Believe it or not, there’s a widespread perception that it is. What’s this all about? Well, if you recall we have talked about violence against women in Guatemala. Recently there’s women-only buses in Guatemala City too… another indicator.

Another important fact has been revealed the past week, equally overwhelming: 33,000 calls that report cases of sexual violence in almost half year of 2011. Numbers speak for themselves and that’s crazy. The phone number to report these abuses in Guatemala is 1571 and provides free attention to victims of sexual violence.

In psychology, the previous example is also know as: The Just-World Fallacy.

Palabras huecas y palabras preñadas

Thursday, April 28th, 2011

The title could be translated in the following way: Empty words and pregnant words. In the renewed and restored Sexta Avenida in zona 1 you can still find people checking the trash for food, and if you remember well, a few weeks ago was one of the messages (a bit distorted by classism) that gave the university students in the Huelga de Dolores.

In words of José Milla y Vidaurre Guatemalan writer of the nineteenth century: “Así como suele decirse que hay palabras duras y palabras blandas; palabras dulces y palabras agrias; palabras huecas y palabras preñadas; […]”

“It is commonly said that there are harsh words and soft words, sweet words and bitter words, empty words and pregnant words, […]”

The reality is there, available to everyone, people are buying empty words, words are pregnant with that dose of reality.

Incidentally, the article in which José Milla speaks of these words is called: Un amigo… A friend.